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Successfully Supporting Invisible Disabilities

First Annual Eastern Ontario FASD Symposium

Successfully Supporting Invisible Disabilities for Professionals and Caregivers

Registration deadline is Wednesday, March 22, 2017.
Please check the website frequently for updates.
If you have any questions, please call Susan Campbell at 613-761-9522 Ext. 233

Citizen Advocacy Ottawa’s Fetal Alcohol Resource Program is proud to invite you to attend the First Annual Invisible Disabilities Symposium.  The Symposium Committee members, from in and around Ottawa, share a passion for supporting individuals with invisible disabilities, including, but not limited to, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. We have joined together to help educate, connect and encourage individuals with invisible disabilities and those who support them and the unique challenges they experience.  We know that this two-day event will be relevant and interesting to professionals and caregivers alike.

We are excited to present our key note speaker, Kim Barthel, a leading expert in sensory processing, trauma, attachment and neuroscience. Her expertise will help us recognize ways we can use the sensory system to help regulate the easily dysregulated brain. In addition, we have invited a number of local experts to present on a wide range of topics including: FASD basics, public policy, things that help in the school system and lifetime supports.

Did you know that we also provide free specialized child care on Saturday to help families attend? Spaces are limited so register early.

Dates

Friday, March 31, 2017 & Saturday, April 1, 2017

Address

The MET
2176 Prince of Wales Dr.
Nepean, ON K2E 0A1

Ticket Prices

Early Bird Rate (Before March 1, 2017)

One Day Two Days
Caregivers, students and individuals living with invisible disabilities $50 $75
Professionals $100 $175
Professional
groups (10+)
$75 per day $75 per day

Registration (After March 1, 2017)

One Day Two Days
Caregivers, students and individuals living with invisible disabilities $75 $100
Professionals $125 $200
Professional
groups (10+)
$100 per day $100 per day

Buy Tickets Now

Key Note Speaker: Kim Barthel

Kim BarthelKim is a world-renowned teacher and occupational therapist, most active in the fields of relational trauma and sensory processing. She is very active supporting multi-disciplinary healing in many cultures internationally. Her revolutionary process reinforces the importance of relationship in therapy, blending the art of intuitive inquiry with cutting-edge developments in neuroscience. Some of Kim’s specialties include FASD, Neuro-Developmental Treatment, Attachment and Mental Health. To empower personal reflection, she recently co-authored the national best-seller “Conversations with a Rattlesnake” with Theo Fleury. Kim’s mission is to support the conscious evolution of the human spirit. For more on Kim, check out kimbarthel.ca

Child Care

Another unique feature of this symposium is we are providing limited free child care on the Saturday. Families of children with invisible disabilities can often have great difficulties attending events because of the complex needs of their children. This symposium will follow the example of the FASD Roundtable Conferences in New Westminster, BC and train volunteers from college programs, etc. to create and support the needs of these children so that they can come and have a fun, safe day of activity while their parents have the opportunity to learn new strategies, share knowledge and network with professionals and other caregivers.

Cancellation Policy

75% refund before March 21st (tickets are transferrable)
After March 21st, tickets are non-refundable.

Friday, March 31, 2017

8:30 – 9:00 | Registration
sign in

 

 

9:00 – 9:15 | Welcome | Aboriginal welcome
Dr. Isra Levy’s welcome address & master of ceremonies introduction.

9:15 – 10:15 | Keynote part 1 | Kim Barthel

When Disabilities are INVISIBLE

This keynote address illuminates the impacts of invisible disabilities upon of the lives of countless people around us. When we don’t understand what is behind the complex behaviours we see, there is a much greater chance that we’ll respond to chaotic events from a position of stress, which often makes matters worse. When symptoms are vague and subtle, they can be misperceived or missed entirely. By bringing neurobiology into the equation, along with a wealth of information and experience in supporting people with special needs, Kim will bring awareness to the idea that we all have special needs. No one is immune from having aspects of ourselves that get in our way – and especially as professionals in this field we have to become as self-aware of these as possible. This is the key to helping others. When it comes to supporting individuals with FASD symptoms, formally diagnosed or not, we can learn to appreciate the unique challenges that may be involved. By adopting an attitude of becoming a behavioural detective – always aiming to see what lies behind any challenge – we bring light to whatever situation we face. Awareness and shame-removal; this is the essence of this address.

10:15 – 10:45 | Coffee / Tea Break
Location: Gym

10:45 – 12:00 | Keynote part 2 | Kim Barthel
Keynote address continued

12:00 – 1:00 | Lunch
Location: Gym

1:00 – 1:45 | Break out session A | Classrooms

FASD 101 (Beginner)

This session provides a basic introduction to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, including information on red flags that can indicate FASD in someone who is undiagnosed or misdiagnosed, along with ways to distinguish FASD from other neurodevelopmental disorders such as ADHD and autism.

Presenter: Nancy Lockwood

Nancy Lockwood is one of the FASD Coordinators with the Fetal Alcohol Resource Program at Citizen Advocacy Ottawa. She is a member of the FASD Coalition of Ottawa, assists with programming for the FASD Group of Ottawa and is a founding member of Ottawa’s FASD Enrichment Fund. Nancy has three decades of experience working in the field of education, and she has extensive experience supporting students with brain differences including FASD.

What's the diagnosis?

General overview of the new Canadian FASD diagnostic guidelines. Why is a multidisciplinary approach recommended? Invisible disabilities are complex to diagnosis. In this session participants will learn how to distinguish the subtle differences in a clinical setting.

Presenters: Dr. David Collins and Janet Carioni – OT

Dr. David Collins

Dr. Collins is a registered paediatric psychologist who specialises in neuropsychology and rehabilitation psychology.  He obtained his PhD in Clinical Neuropsychology from the University of Windsor, one of only two accredited programs in Clinical Neuropsychology in Canada.  He studied under Byron Rourke, a leading expert in the field of learning disabilities.  Dr. Collins trained at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan and completed a paediatric neuropsychology internship at the London Health Sciences Centre.  He then worked in the rehabilitation unit at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between 2003 and 2009 .  Dr. Collins has published scholarly articles in the fields of learning disabilities, epilepsy, developmental disabilities, and paediatric brain injury.   He is now in private practice in Ottawa.  Dr. Collins is a member of the College of Psychologists of Ontario and the Canadian Psychological Association.

Janet Carioni is an occupational therapist. Her passion for team-based FASD diagnosis, intervention and advocacy began in 2006. She has worked on multi-disciplinary FASD diagnostic teams, was active in the implementation of an FASD classroom and has been interviewed both on the radio and television as an FASD advocate and educator. In addition to Janet’s clinical experience, she has been involved in research projects in the area of sleep and FASD. She has lectured on the subject at international and regional conferences and submitted a poster presentation for the International Brain Injury Conference.

Brainstorming together: Supporting sensory needs everyday

Q & A with Kim Barthel

Presenter: Kim Barthel

Occupational Therapist Kim Barthel, is a world renowned speaker who specializes in sensory processing and neurobiology to help people understand brain differences. She provides practical strategies for helping people emotionally regulate themselves and the people they work with and care about.

Attachment: What is it and how does the Sensory System affect it?

This session will explain what healthy attachment is and will describe the challenges and offer some helpful strategies when sensory complications occur.

Presenters: Michelle Hogeterp & Tanya Eichler

Michelle Hogeterp is a registered Marriage and Family Therapist. She is certified in Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy which focuses on families working together to address early trauma and develop attachment. She is in private practice in Ottawa. She works primarily with children and adolescents who are in care or adopted. Michelle is also trained in EMDR and theraplay.

Tanya Eichler is part of the Fetal Alcohol Resource Program team and also has a private counselling practice in Kemptville. She gained her knowledge of FASD through work in British Columbia’s FASD Key Worker program while she completed her Masters of Counselling. Her training in FASD and trauma have informed her use of sensory strategies in her counselling practice to help with regulation and processing.

What is successful inclusion for people with invisible disabilities?

This session will start with some information on how inclusion is defined and described by various groups. Following that, participants will be asked to consider a series of questions about inclusion, and to share examples of success. The facilitators will then try to develop consensus around key support factors and barriers to inclusion.

Presenters: Barb Sabourin & Elspeth Ross

Elspeth Ross is well known in the Ottawa FASD community. She is the facilitator of the FASD Group of Ottawa, a longtime member of the FASD Coalition, an educator in FASD, and the parent of two young men affected by FASD.

Barbara Sabourin is the Chair of the Fetal Alcohol Resource Program Advisory Committee, a member of the board of Citizen Advocacy Ottawa, and also the parent of an affected individual.

It's not just kids being kids: Supporting young people with invisible disabilities navigate experiences of bullying

Bullying in Canadian schools continues to be a serious issue impacting the lives of children, with potentially damaging and far-reaching effects. Children with special health needs, such as invisible disabilities, are particularly vulnerable, and often rely on the support of peers and adults to navigate these harmful experiences. This presentation will provide an overview of current research on bullying in a Canadian context, with a focus on the incidence and experience of bullying with children with exceptionalities. Additionally, special attention will be directed to discussing how adults, in particular, can (a) create safe environments for children and youth with invisible disabilities; and (b) intervene effectively when these young people are involved in bullying incidences. Evidenced-based strategies will be presented within a framework of understanding bullying as a multi-faceted problem that requires healthy relationship solutions.

Presenters: Karen Bouchard & Heather Woods

Karen Bouchard is a certified elementary/secondary school teacher in Ontario, and currently a PhD Candidate and Part-time Professor at the Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa. Her research and teaching interests focus on children’s social-emotional experiences at school, particularly teacher-student relationships, bullying and victimization, and adolescent friendships. She is an executive graduate student member of the Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network (PREVNet.ca)

Heather Woods is a PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa. Her research explores school climate and bullying prevention, specifically how fostering healthy relationships between students, teachers, and administrators can benefit bullying prevention programs. She works with the Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network (PREVNet) in developing workshops on bullying prevention and intervention for educators and caregivers.

2:00 – 2:45 | Break out session B | Classrooms

Why is FASD important to Public Health and Public Policy?

Presenters: Kathy Unsworth, CanFASD & Holly McKay & Bev Croft

Kathy Unsworth, CANFASD

Kathy Unsworth comes to CanFASD with a background in public health and community nutrition. After completing her Master’s degree at the University of Toronto, she worked for the Canadian Association for Community Care, launching a national senior’s nutrition initiative. After a move to Toronto and 2 years at the York Region Public Health Unit, Kathy joined the Ministry of Health and did health planning and policy work as well writing briefing notes for the Minister’s office. Working and volunteering in varying capacities in the not-for-profit sector since then has also given Kathy experience in fundraising, grant writing and public-private partnerships.

Justice issues and invisible disabilities

Youth Now Canada has developed in-house FASD expertise over the past ten years due to an urgent need to support the young people with FASD whom they serve regularly. Through a panel discussion format, representatives of Youth Now Canada will cover the following:

  • why people with FASD are overrepresented in the justice system and challenges people with invisible disabilities face once in the justice system;
  • the agency’s experience working with young people with FASD, under the strength-based philosophy, in custody and court settings;
  • an overview of Youth Now’s current pilot program, “Connections for Youth with FASD,” providing marginalized youth with better access to justice through accurate information and hands-on support when dealing with legal systems.

Presenter: YouthNow

This panel discussion will be moderated by Benjamin Roebuck (PhD, Criminology), the coordinator of Algonquin College’s Graduate Victimology program. He is also the Vice President for Youth Now Canada, and has co-authored a manual on strength-based interventions for young people. He is an instructor for Mental Health First Aid with the Mental Health Commission of Canada and currently sits on the Board of Directors for Crime Prevention Ottawa. Benjamin’s life work focuses on supporting social justice, victim assistance, and contributing to research around strengths and resilience intervention models.

Panelists will also be representatives from Youth Now Canada: Jenny Roebuck, Alanna Wall and Maryann Roebuck. Youth Now Canada is a youth-focused organization that has served youth with complex needs over the last three decades and has worked extensively with probation services, the courts, education and child welfare.

Brainstorming together: Supporting sensory needs everyday

Q & A with Kim Barthel

Presenter: Kim Barthel

Occupational Therapist Kim Barthel, is a world renowned speaker who specializes in sensory processing and neurobiology to help people understand brain differences. She provides practical strategies for helping people emotionally regulate themselves and the people they work with and care about.

Power of positive relationships

Strong, positive and reciprocal relationships can be a powerful protective factor throughout one’s life. Through relationships, we learn and develop empathy, social etiquette, social skills and we are encouraged to try new things. This presentation will shed some light on the importance of developing relationships, its protective factors and some tools to successfully build and nurture these relationships.

Presenter: Caroline Granger

Caroline is the director of Valor & Solutions, an organization that strives to create positive conditions for people to flourish.

Caroline is passionate about helping people journey towards rich and meaningful lives no matter the circumstances. Caroline began her journey in human services as a child protection intake worker in 1998. She transitioned to a supervisor role in 2001, and from 2009 to 2014 held a Director of service position at Valoris for Children and Adults of Prescott-Russell, a multiservice organization.

Caroline shares her passion, experience and knowledge with management teams, front line workers, parents and community groups through various workshops. Her engaging presentation style consistently inspires clinicians, administrators, and parents to work together to multiply opportunities for people in order that they may have a full and meaningful life!

Building an external brain to support executive functioning difficulties

Learn how to effectively incorporate practical strategies in everyday life to support the brain impairments.

Presenters: Nancy Lockwood & Tanya Eichler

Nancy Lockwood and Tanya Eichler are both FASD Coordinators for Citizen Advocacy Ottawa’s Fetal Alcohol Resource Program.

Nancy has thirty years of experience working in the education field supporting both neurotypical students and those with exceptionalities. Through extensive training and experience, Nancy has developed a specialty in supporting, educating and advocating for individuals affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. She has provided one on one support to an individual affected by FASD for over twenty years, as well as providing assistance to many Ottawa families living with FASD. This has included service navigation to secure appropriate social and medical supports; parent mentoring; and creation of lifetime networks of care. Nancy is a member of the FASD Coalition of Ottawa; FASD Group of Ottawa; and is a founding member of Ottawa’s FASD Enrichment Fund.

Tanya Eichler gained her knowledge of FASD through work in British Columbia’s FASD Key Worker program while she completed her Masters of Counselling. She helped support many families with children diagnosed with FASD through the assessment process as well as in the various systems and agencies they were involved with. She provided training and ran support and education groups and participated in the FASD Collaboration Roundtable, helping to organize annual conferences to better equip families and professionals to support individuals with FASD. Since moving “back home” to Ontario in 2014, Tanya has opened a private counselling practice where she focuses on individuals and families who have experienced trauma including prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol. She is also part of the FASD Coalition and is thrilled to be participating in the Fetal Alcohol Resource Program.

Special Education and Invisible Disabilities

Navigating the Special Education System, and supporting every student’s needs. Developing an IEP to support students with invisible disabilities.

Presenter: OCSB – Karen Konrad

Karen Konrad has extensive experience in supporting students with special education needs. She currently holds the position of Acting Special Education Consultant, in the Special Education and Student Services Department with the Ottawa Catholic School Board. Karen has held the position of a resource teacher for over 12 years, where she has worked alongside teachers, school administration and support staff to support students with special education needs.

2:45 – 3:00 | Coffee / Tea Break
Location: Gym

 

 

3:00 – 3:45 | Defining success – Panel
Large group
3:45 – 4:00 | Closing remarks
Different perspectives invited participants

Saturday, April 1, 2017

8:30 – 9:00 | Registration
sign in

 

 

9:00 – 9:15 | Welcome
9:15 – 10:15 | Keynote part 1 | Kim Barthel

Compassionate Strategies for Change

This keynote address is geared for parents and caregivers to understand that things can get better. Through neuroplasticity, the brain is changeable. Relationships can be strengthened. But caring for individuals with FASD takes commitment and mindfulness, and compassion. Through real stories from around the world and some from just around the corner, Kim shares engrossing experiences and offers a wide spectrum of practical strategies that are making lives easier for many. Each person and family dealing with FASD is unique, but what they share is the hope that they can still be their very best, however they define that, and ultimately lead happy lives. These goals are attainable. It starts with informed compassion, and it produces change.

10:15 – 10:45 | Coffee / Tea Break
Location: Gym

10:45 – 12:00 | Keynote part 2 | Kim Barthel
Keynote address continued

12:00 – 1:00 | Lunch
Location: Gym

1:00 – 1:45 | Break out session C | Classrooms

What’s new and exciting in the world of FASD research?

This session will provide an overview of the latest FASD research including prevalence rates, research into FASD as a whole body disorder; anxiety as a primary characteristic; and basics of epigenetics.

Presenter: Nancy Lockwood

Nancy Lockwood is one of the FASD Coordinators with the Fetal Alcohol Resource Program at Citizen Advocacy Ottawa. She is a member of the FASD Coalition of Ottawa, FASD Group of Ottawa and is a founding member of Ottawa’s FASD Enrichment Fund. Nancy has three decades of experience working in the education field. She and her team stay current on the latest international FASD research through collaboration with CanFASD; Kids Brain Health (formerly NeuroDevNet); the Canadian FASD Diagnostic Guidelines authors and through attendance at FASD research conferences.

Looking beyond and planning for the future - Lifetime Networks

Lifetime Networks Ottawa works to create a safe and secure future for people with disabilities.

Presenter: Kelly Howson

Kelly Howson gained her Masters degree in Social Work from Carleton University in 2004. Kelly has a varied professional background having worked at length in the mental health and addictions sector at both the Canadian Mental Health Association, on an Assertive Community Treatment team, and in a community health centre. She has experience in child welfare and has done community outreach in the LGBT community. Kelly joined Citizen Advocacy as a Social Worker in 2015 and is the Coordinator of Lifetime Networks Ottawa and the Children Sibling Groups.

What is successful inclusion for people with invisible disabilities?

This session will start with some information on how inclusion is defined and described by various groups. Following that, participants will be asked to consider a series of questions about inclusion, and to share examples of success. The facilitators will then try to develop consensus around key support factors and barriers to inclusion.

Presenters: Elspeth Ross & Barbara Sabourin

Elspeth Ross is well known in the Ottawa FASD community. She is the facilitator of the FASD Group of Ottawa, a longtime member of the FASD Coalition, an educator in FASD, and the parent of two young men affected by FASD.

Barbara Sabourin is the Chair of the Fetal Alcohol Resource Program Advisory Committee, a member of the board of Citizen Advocacy Ottawa, and also the parent of an affected individual.

Power of positive relationships

Strong, positive and reciprocal relationships can be a powerful protective factor throughout one’s life. Through relationships, we learn and develop empathy, social etiquette, social skills and we are encouraged to try new things. This presentation will shed some light on the importance of developing relationships, its protective factors and some tools to successfully build and nurture these relationships.

Presenter: Caroline Granger

Caroline is the director of Valor & Solutions, an organization that strives to create positive conditions for people to flourish.

Caroline is passionate about helping people journey towards rich and meaningful lives no matter the circumstances. Caroline began her journey in human services as a child protection intake worker in 1998. She transitioned to a supervisor role in 2001, and from 2009 to 2014 held a Director of service position at Valoris for Children and Adults of Prescott-Russell, a multiservice organization.

Caroline shares her passion, experience and knowledge with management teams, front line workers, parents and community groups through various workshops. Her engaging presentation style consistently inspires clinicians, administrators, and parents to work together to multiply opportunities for people in order that they may have a full and meaningful life!

Attachment: What is it and how does the Sensory System affect it?

This session will explain what healthy attachment is and will describe the challenges and offer some helpful strategies when sensory complications occur.

Presenters: Michelle Hogeterp & Tanya Eichler

Michelle Hogeterp is a registered Marriage and Family Therapist. She is certified in Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy which focuses on families working together to address early trauma and develop attachment. She is in private practice in Ottawa. She works primarily with children and adolescents who are in care or adopted. Michelle is also trained in EMDR and theraplay.

Tanya Eichler gained her knowledge of FASD through work in British Columbia’s FASD Key Worker program while she completed her Masters of Counselling. She helped support many families with children diagnosed with FASD through the assessment process as well as in the various systems and agencies they were involved with. She provided training and ran support and education groups and participated in the FASD Collaboration Roundtable, helping to organize annual conferences to better equip families and professionals to support individuals with FASD. Since moving “back home” to Ontario in 2014, Tanya has opened a private counselling practice where she focuses on individuals and families who have experienced trauma including prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol. She is also part of the FASD Coalition and is thrilled to be participating in the Fetal Alcohol Resource Program.

What's the diagnosis?

General overview of the new Canadian FASD diagnostic guidelines. Why is a multidisciplinary approach recommended? Invisible disabilities are complex to diagnosis. In this session participants will learn how to distinguish the subtle differences in a clinical setting.

Presenters: Janet Carioni – OT

Janet Carioni is an occupational therapist. Her passion for team-based FASD diagnosis, intervention and advocacy began in 2006. She has worked on multi-disciplinary FASD diagnostic teams, was active in the implementation of an FASD classroom and has been interviewed both on the radio and television as an FASD advocate and educator. In addition to Janet’s clinical experience, she has been involved in research projects in the area of sleep and FASD. She has lectured on the subject at international and regional conferences and submitted a poster presentation for the International Brain Injury Conference.

2:00 – 2:45 | Break out session D | Classrooms

The Big I’s:IEP’s, IPRC’s and other Info

This session will unravel the mysteries of IEP’s, IPRC’s and other assessments so parents can advocate effectively for children with invisible disabilities.

Presenter: Rob More

Rob More has been a special education teacher for more than 20 years in the Ottawa Catholic School Board and was named a Capital Educator finalist last year. With his Master’s degree, Specialist certification, and father of three special needs children, he is a passionate advocate for any special needs child needing a voice.

Effectively communicating 'All About Me'

It can be exhausting and annoying to tell people about your child’s disabilities and advocate for supports over and over again. Creating a storybook that tells others “All About Me” is an efficient way to share the message. This works great with teachers, camp counsellors, swim instructors, employers, volunteer coordinators, family members, really anyone whom you interact with that would benefit from know about your strengths, interests, needs and strategies that you find helpful.

Presenter: Janet Carioni

Janet Carioni is an occupational therapist. Her passion for team-based FASD diagnosis, intervention and advocacy began in 2006. She has worked on multi-disciplinary FASD diagnostic teams, was active in the implementation of an FASD classroom and has been interviewed both on the radio and television as an FASD advocate and educator. In addition to Janet’s clinical experience, she has been involved in research projects in the area of sleep and FASD. She has lectured on the subject at international and regional conferences and submitted a poster presentation for the International Brain Injury Conference.

Brainstorming together: Supporting sensory needs everyday

Q & A with Kim Barthel

Presenter: Kim Barthel

Occupational Therapist Kim Barthel, is a world renowned speaker who specializes in sensory processing and neurobiology to help people understand brain differences. She provides practical strategies for helping people emotionally regulate themselves and the people they work with and care about.

Therapy animals working with clients who have special needs

Ottawa Therapy Dogs would provide a brief overview of Ottawa Therapy Dogs and a role and description of the type of work we do (in general, and with special needs clients).

If the facility allows for a therapy dog to be present, the handler and dog would be present in the group discussions to go over their placement experience with special needs students in schools.

We would also discuss how therapy dogs affect the people around them (and how animals generally bring this to home or work environment).

In addition, we will go over what a therapy dog is and what is required to become one (temperament, training and evaluation).

Tranquil Acres Inc. provides equine assisted psychotherapy, personal development and learning through the EAGALA (Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association) model. The team at Tranquil Acres Inc. facilitates the EAGALA model for a variety of clients with social, emotional and mental health needs. By incorporating horses into therapy sessions, the horses become the client’s therapist alongside a registered mental health professional and equine specialist to provide a safe, non-judgemental space to allow the client to tell their story and heal.

Presenters: Rachelle Page, Chair, Ottawa Therapy Dogs (OTD), Mary Lou Trappit and Clarence, OTD Volunteer Handler, Elizabeth Eacrett, Occupational Therapist, Shanesya Kean, Social Worker

Rachelle is the Chair of Ottawa Therapy Dogs and has been volunteering for the organisation since 2010. She began volunteering with OTD on the Communications Committee because of her love of dogs and the comfort that they bring. While she does not visit clients with her beagle Patches, he has proven to be her own therapy dog.

Mary Lou Trappit and Clarence

After working full time for 36 years, Mary Lou retired from the Department of Surgery at Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in 2012. She is a wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother and volunteers with Ottawa Therapy Dogs (OTD) with Clarence, a Spinone Italiano.

Since 2013, they have been visiting OCAPDD (Ottawa Carleton Association for Persons with Developmental Disabilities) at their Loeb Vocational Centre in Vanier. The clients love him, interacting with him in any way they can, depending on their capabilities.

They also have a second placement at OCTC/CHEO (Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre). Most of these children have limited mobility and other health issues.

Clarence and Mary Lou are also have a third placement through OTD’s R.E.A.D. (Reading Education Assistance Dogs) with another CHEO program.

Shanesya Kean, MSW, RSW:

Shanesya is a registered social worker with the Ontario College of Social Workers. She holds a Master of Social Work from the University of Calgary, in addition to a Bachelor of Social Work from Lakehead University, and a Bachelor of Art and Social Science (Psychology and Criminology) from the University of Windsor.

She has 8 years of experience providing counselling and social work services to adults and children in community and hospital agencies. She is skilled in providing assessment and treatment to individuals and families. She specializes in treating clients with recent or historical trauma with the use of evidence-based therapies. She is also versed in providing treatment to people with a variety of mental health and interpersonal issues.

Shanesya believes that therapy is a collaborative and supportive approach that helps individuals or groups let go of what is no longer needed in order to integrate a deeper connection with their true selves. In addition to traditional talk therapies, she also believes in healing through the use of expressive and experiential therapies and has historically integrated play, art, and music into her practice. She believes in the strength and intuitive abilities of horses that makes them an ideal guide in the healing journey.

Elizabeth Eacrett, OT Reg. (Ont.):

Elizabeth is an occupational therapist (OT) registered and licensed with the College of Occupational Therapists of Ontario. Elizabeth received her Masters degree in Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy from the University of Toronto and her Bachelor of Arts degree (Honours) in English, Rhetoric and Professional Writing from the University of Waterloo.

Elizabeth has 8 years experience as an occupational therapist and currently works in private practice with older adolescents and adults with mental health issues, i.e., depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Elizabeth provides individual and group-based therapy to support her clients in participating more fully in the life activities (“occupations”) that they need and want to do. The occupational therapy approach considers a person’s strengths, interests, and priorities and uses methods that emphasize participating in meaningful activity. Elizabeth recognizes that interacting with horses can offer opportunities for creating meaning in clients’ lives.

Elizabeth is a trained and certified Mental Health Professional in the EAGALA model of equine-assisted psychotherapy and personal development. Elizabeth sees the profound benefits of using horses in therapy; horses can allow clients to develop self-awareness in a non-judgmental way. Horses can calm, ground, and help to progress clients’ wellness journeys.

It's not just kids being kids: Supporting young people with invisible disabilities navigate experiences of bullying

Bullying in Canadian schools continues to be a serious issue impacting the lives of children, with potentially damaging and far-reaching effects. Children with special health needs, such as invisible disabilities, are particularly vulnerable, and often rely on the support of peers and adults to navigate these harmful experiences. This presentation will provide an overview of current research on bullying in a Canadian context, with a focus on the incidence and experience of bullying with children with exceptionalities. Additionally, special attention will be directed to discussing how adults, in particular, can (a) create safe environments for children and youth with invisible disabilities; and (b) intervene effectively when these young people are involved in bullying incidences. Evidenced-based strategies will be presented within a framework of understanding bullying as a multi-faceted problem that requires healthy relationship solutions.

Presenters: Karen Bouchard & Heather Woods

Karen Bouchard is a certified elementary/secondary school teacher in Ontario, and currently a PhD Candidate and Part-time Professor at the Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa. Her research and teaching interests focus on children’s social-emotional experiences at school, particularly teacher-student relationships, bullying and victimization, and adolescent friendships. She is an executive graduate student member of the Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network (PREVNet.ca)

Heather Woods is a PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa. Her research explores school climate and bullying prevention, specifically how fostering healthy relationships between students, teachers, and administrators can benefit bullying prevention programs. She works with the Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network (PREVNet) in developing workshops on bullying prevention and intervention for educators and caregivers.

What is an External Brain and how do I build one?

Learn how to effectively incorporate practical strategies in everyday life to support the brain impairments associated with FASD and other invisible disabilities.

Presenters: Tanya Eichler and Nancy Lockwood

Nancy Lockwood and Tanya Eichler are both FASD Coordinators for Citizen Advocacy Ottawa’s Fetal Alcohol Resource Program.

Nancy has thirty years of experience working in the education field supporting both neurotypical students and those with exceptionalities. Through extensive training and experience, Nancy has developed a specialty in supporting, educating and advocating for individuals affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. She has provided one on one support to an individual affected by FASD for over twenty years, as well as providing assistance to many Ottawa families living with FASD. This has included service navigation to secure appropriate social and medical supports; parent mentoring; and creation of lifetime networks of care. Nancy is a member of the FASD Coalition of Ottawa; FASD Group of Ottawa; and is a founding member of Ottawa’s FASD Enrichment Fund.

Tanya Eichler gained her knowledge of FASD through work in British Columbia’s FASD Key Worker program while she completed her Masters of Counselling. She helped support many families with children diagnosed with FASD through the assessment process as well as in the various systems and agencies they were involved with. She provided training and ran support and education groups and participated in the FASD Collaboration Roundtable, helping to organize annual conferences to better equip families and professionals to support individuals with FASD. Since moving “back home” to Ontario in 2014, Tanya has opened a private counselling practice where she focuses on individuals and families who have experienced trauma including prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol. She is also part of the FASD Coalition and is thrilled to be participating in the Fetal Alcohol Resource Program.

2:45 – 3:00 | Coffee / Tea Break
Location: Gym

 

 

3:00 – 3:45 | Creating change through empowerment: Looking forward with hope
All registrants reconvene together

3:45 – 4:00 | Closing remarks

Funding for this event will be provided in part by the Public Health Agency of Canada

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Tel/Tel. 613-761-9522
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Fax/Télécopie: 613-761-9525

 

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Charitable Registration Number/Numéro d’enregistrement d’organisme de bienfaisance
13036 2817 RR0001